Our daily roundup of retirement news your clients may be thinking about.

4 signs your client retired too early
Seniors who left the workplace for good and still do not qualify to receive Social Security benefits may have retired too early, according to this article on Yahoo Finance. They also retired earlier than they should if they are not yet eligible to claim health coverage through Medicare. Those who get bored after retirement and are spending more than they should may have also retired too early.


Social Security's up 46% since 2000, so why are retirees poorer than ever?
A study by the Senior Citizens League has found that Social Security payments have increased 46% since 2000 as a result of inflation increases, according to this article on Motley Fool. However, retirees' purchasing power has dropped 34% as their expenses have increased by nearly 100%. That's because the annual cost-of-living adjustments is tied to the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers, but retirees spend more on goods and services that increase in prices faster than the average inflation.

Paying down student loans vs. saving for retirement: Here's how to prioritize
Young clients should consider striking a balance between saving for retirement and paying down student loans, according to this article on CNBC. For example, they should compare the interest rates of their student loans with the possible return from retirement investments, and focus on which one has the higher rate. They should also take advantage of tax breaks on retirement plan contributions and student loan deduction.

How to save twice your salary (or more) by age 35
Young workers can amass considerable retirement savings by age 35 if they make the most of the employer's match contributions and escalations in their 401(k) plans, according to this article on MarketWatch. They should also consider reducing their spending to free more money to save. Young clients are also advised to start saving for retirement while they are paying down their debt.

10 questions to ask yourself about your money if you want to retire earlier
This article on Forbes lists 10 questions that clients should ask themselves if they consider retiring early. "With so many money distractions, having a system to get on track to retire earlier — and stay on track — can help," writes the expert. "A weekly money meeting, an appointment you keep with yourself or your partner if you have one, can be a great start. Setting aside a regular time set aside to focus on your money can help you meet multiple goals."

Register or login for access to this item and much more

All Employee Benefit Adviser content is archived after seven days.

Community members receive:
  • All recent and archived articles
  • Conference offers and updates
  • A full menu of enewsletter options
  • Web seminars, white papers, ebooks

Don't have an account? Register for Free Unlimited Access