Our daily roundup of retirement news your clients may be thinking about.

Is your client’s retirement portfolio all-weather?
The uncertain stock market environment should prompt retirement investors to build an all-weather portfolio, writes Morningstar's Christine Benz. This means making decisions that will ensure that their portfolio can withstand various risks, such as rising interest rates, inflation and recession, explains the expert.

Source: Bloomberg


How will you spend your time in retirement? A 'wish list journal' can help
Seniors are advised to have a "wish list journal" when planning on how they will spend their time after they retire, writes an expert on Kiplinger. "Having a plan for retirement is essential. Your plan can be fluid — change and adapt along the way as your desires and dreams evolve...." explains the expert. "If you know what you are saving and planning for, you will be more enthusiastic and conscientious about saving for it."

Retire early or keep on working? How to prepare for either choice.
Retirement planning is crucial regardless of whether clients opt to leave the work force early or continue working into their 80s, writes an expert on The Washington Post. "I’m going to suggest some reading in three areas: when to retire, health care options for early retirees and how to spend what you’ve saved once you stop working," writes the expert. "When it comes to the decision of when to retire, there’s no one rule of thumb for everyone. In fact, depending on your health care options and savings, you might not be able to retire."

Women outlive men. Why do they retire earlier?
A study has found that although husbands and wives retire at the same time, married women retire at younger ages than their male counterparts simply because they are younger than their spouses, according to this article from CNBC. The earlier retirement age “seems counter-intuitive since women have longer life expectancies and have shorter careers due to delayed or interrupted labor force participation while raising children,” says the researcher. Because of their circumstances, women should file for retirement at “older ages than men.”

When an IRA beats a 401(k) for your retirement savings
A report from Cerulli Associates has found that IRA assets are likely to grow about twice the assets in 401(k) plans in the next four years, according to this article on CBS Moneywatch. The rising trend could be attributed to 401(k) rollovers, as retirees and workers prefer flexible withdrawal options that an IRA offers them. Before transferring 401(k) funds into an IRA, clients should seek good advice, as leaving the money with the employer-sponsored plan can be a better option under certain circumstances.

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