Our daily roundup of retirement news your clients may be thinking about.

Should couples sleep together or separately in retirement
Some couples may be better off sleeping separately in retirement, as the changes could make it difficult for them to get a good night sleep, writes a Forbes contributor. Those who opt to sleep in separate rooms should "have a plan in place to avoid becoming just roommates, making sure each partner’s needs for intimacy are being met," writes the expert.


Forget Florida: More northern retirees head to Appalachia
Many seniors are relocating to the Appalachian communities in North Carolina, Georgia and Tennessee because of various factors that include moderate weather, low taxes and costs, according to this article on The Wall Street Journal. "These retirees are reshaping local economies, boosting everything from tax revenues to restaurant receipts to sales of electric chair lifts for the elderly," states this article.

More savers are rejecting retirement accounts in favor of these investments
Data from retail investors firm Hearts & Wallets show that the number of clients owning taxable brokerage accounts has increased 10 percentage points over the past five years, according to this article on MarketWatch. The number of clients with checking, saving and CD accounts also rose nine percentage points. However, ownership of employer-sponsored plans remained unchanged, with contributions dropping by five percentage points.

Why do annuities have such a bad reputation?
Although annuities provide guaranteed income and can help secure one's retirement, many clients are veering away from the financial product, according to this article on Motley Fool. That's because annuities are subject to complicated tax rules. Clients will also lose a stream of guaranteed income if the insurer behind the product goes bankrupt. The fees involved can also be hefty, making these financial products unattractive.

5 ways to rebuild retirement savings later in life
Pre-retirees who need to catch up on their retirement goals are advised to max out contributions to their 401(k) and other similar accounts, according to this article on NerdWallet. By boosting their contributions to these tax-deferred retirement accounts, they reduce their annual taxable income. IRA investors may also contribute the maximum account, which is $5,500 or $6,500 for those aged 50 and above. “Whatever you do, increasing your contributions up to the limit is definitely the best place to start,” says an expert.