Protect your nest egg from a volatile market
Clients should review their investments as they get close to retirement and develop a plan to minimize their portfolio's vulnerability to volatile markets, according to this article on Kiplinger. This is because of the sequence of returns risk that could lead to greater losses once they start taking distributions from their retirement accounts. To reduce this risk, clients should ensure a diversified portfolio and consider alternative assets, such as real estate, commodities and annuities.

Source: Bloomberg
Source: Bloomberg

A primer on Social Security spousal benefits
A working senior who decides to file for his Social Security spousal benefit on his 69-year-old wife's record at age 62 will receive only 35% of her retirement benefit, not 50% if he claims at 66, according to this article on USA Today. He is also deemed to have filed for his own retirement benefit if he applies for a spousal benefit before 66, meaning both benefits are reduced. His actual benefit is further reduced because of his wage income.

How to retire abroad, and where to go
Moving abroad in retirement is a feasible option for seniors who want a lower cost of living, affordable healthcare services and better weather conditions, according to this article on Forbes. Mexico, Costa Rica, Panama, Belize and Peru are the countries that this article recommends. Before making any decision, though, clients should make other considerations, such as tax laws and residency requirements, and are advised to try living for a couple of months in the country where they intend to retire.

The best $99 you can spend to become a better investor
Investors stand to benefit more from reading the best books on investing than from subscribing to newsletters offering market insights, according to this article on MarketWatch. For example, while a newsletter from a financial magazine claims its portfolio has produced a 298.0% return since it was created, market data shows a low-cost value index fund has returned 539.8% over a 16-year period with less risk. Investors may want to acquire copies of Jason Zweig's "Your Money & Your Brain", John Bogle's “The Little Book of Common Sense Investing”, and Eric Tyson's “Mutual Funds for Dummies”.

The 3 big questions: How to tell if you're ready to retire
The lack of motivation to work could be an indicator that seniors are ready to retire, according to this article on Motley Fool. They may also be prepared to leave the workplace for good if they have identified at least three core pursuits that will give them meaning and purpose after retirement. Seniors should compute for the possible earnings from their retirement account and other resources, and try to live on this income for a couple of months so they will know if they are ready to leave the workplace for good.

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