Many trends within the employee benefits industry challenge advisers to think creatively on behalf of their clients. For instance, millennials are more likely to pay off student loans and less likely to contribute to their company’s 401(k) plan. They lose the benefit of compound interest over all those years to retirement, which over decades, can amount to up to 80% of a millennial’s nest egg.

When companies experience low participation rates with new hires, the overall health of the plan will suffer and many of the more highly compensated and key employees may not be able to defer as much as they would like into the plan. Advisers must develop relationships with business owners to establish customized retirement plans that work best for their and their employees’ needs.

When advisers overcome these challenges they expand their client base and move toward success. The following five steps will help retirement plan advisers bring their career to the next level:

Understand the fiduciary requirements and minimize the risk of the employer

Strive to impart knowledge on the employer and the participants to make them confident in their retirement plans. Company owners will feel more comfortable if an adviser helps to reduce the fiduciary risk associated with the creation and ongoing operation of a plan. Advisers can share and even take over most of the fiduciary responsibility with the employer to lessen the pressure. With the right information, a business owner can understand the requirements of the plan and is motivated to establish a 401(k) or other type of plan for the benefit of their employees and overall business objectives.

Know the best plan options for the companies you’re serving

Not every company should have a 401(k) plan. While 401(k) plans may be optimal for large and even small companies, small companies may benefit from other types of plans. Small businesses often operate at a loss or minimal profit for many years before they generate significant profit. As a result, business owners may seek a plan — such as a defined benefit plan — that allows them to contribute more toward their retirement. In some cases, this may more than triple the amount of yearly contributions an employer can make compared to a 401(k) plan. Employers can contribute to a defined benefit plan and take a tax deduction equivalent to the contributions made to the plan.

Understand the tax advantages of retirement plans

Successful plan advisers should understand the tax advantages associated with the chosen retirement plan for both the owners and the participants. Traditional 401(k) plans tend to provide the most benefits to employees with tax-deferred contributions. On the other hand, small company owners can benefit from the tax advantages of properly designed cash balance or defined benefit plans. These frequently overlooked plans enable employers to deduct the cost of the company’s plan from their taxable income to secure tax savings.

Employee benefit advisers must have this foundational understanding of the tax advantages to successfully serve their clients. Partner with a retirement company record-keeper and a third-party administrator to learn the details for each option.

Discover profitable prospects among small companies too

Many employee benefit advisers in search of success avoid talking to small companies. However, these small companies have significant potential and are vital to success in an otherwise crowded market. Small companies, even with only three to five employees, are great to work with, especially if you help them establish a defined benefit plan, and if it’s the best plan for them. Through these plans, retirement plan advisers can receive the fees needed to provide the service because the company is making larger contributions than to a profit sharing or 401(k) plan.

Target underserved, yet vibrant markets

According to a recent study from the Pew Charitable Trusts, only 53% of small to midsize companies have retirement plans in place. Owners may think they are too small to be able to afford and monitor a program. These businesses are important prospects to pursue. Make yourself known to these companies and show the employer that there is a retirement plan that will work for their employees and company, no matter the size. Explain what program the company can implement and easily administer with your guidance.

Small companies provide great opportunities for advisers to become successful and differentiate themselves from other industry professionals. Keep in mind that these small companies are also more dependent on advisers because of the costs and risk associated with retirement plans. They will require more frequent contact for advice and personalized service. If you do not have the right expertise in the beginning, partner with someone in your office or a TPA until you have the credentials and knowledge to advise small companies on your own.

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